Call for Abstract

5th International Conference on Bacteriology, will be organized around the theme “Advances in Bacteriology”

Bacteriology 2020 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Bacteriology 2020

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

  • Track 1-1Naturopathy for bacterial infections
  • Track 1-2MARS
  • Track 1-3Pharmacology of antibiotics
  • Track 2-1Antibiotics in oncology
  • Track 2-2Antibiotics in our food system
  • Track 2-3Antibiotic regulatory affairs
  • Track 2-4Antibiotic resistance
  • Track 3-1Emerging infectious diseases
  • Track 3-2Urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Track 3-3Bacteriology of dental infections
  • Track 4-1Intracellular growth
  • Track 4-2Pathogenic mechanisms
  • Track 4-3Bacterial Infectivity
  • Track 4-4Bacterial resistance

Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition that is characterized by vaginal discharge and results from an overgrowth of atypical bacteria in the vagina. It is not a true bacterial infection but rather an imbalance of the bacteria that are normally present in the vagina. Usually treatment is with an antibiotic, such as clindamycin or metronidazole. BV is the most common vaginal infection in women of reproductive age. In the United States about 30% of women between the ages of 14 and 49 are affected. BV is linked to an imbalance of “good” and “harmful” bacteria that are normally found in a woman’s vagina. Bacterial vaginosis results from overgrowth of one of several bacteria naturally found in your vagina. Usually, "good" bacteria (lactobacilli) outnumber "bad" bacteria (anaerobes). But if there are too many anaerobic bacteria, they upset the natural balance of microorganisms in your vagina and cause bacterial vaginosis. BV is a polymicrobial clinical syndrome resulting from replacement of the normal hydrogen peroxide producing Lactobacillus sp. in the vagina with high concentrations of anaerobic bacteria (e.g., Prevotella sp. and Mobiluncus sp.), G. vaginalis, Ureaplasma, Mycoplasma, and numerous fastidious or uncultivated anaerobes. Some women experience transient vaginal microbial changes, whereas others experience them for longer intervals of time.

  • Track 5-1Abnormal vaginal odor
  • Track 5-2Abnormal consistency of vaginal fluid
  • Track 5-3Vaginal pain
  • Track 5-4Vaginal burning
  • Track 6-1Clinical trials of antibiotics
  • Track 6-2Bacterial clinical studies
  • Track 6-3Clinical Microbiology and Infection
  • Track 7-1Bacterial reactions
  • Track 7-2Molecular Biology
  • Track 7-3Toxicity of antibiotics
  • Track 8-1Bacterial¬†pneumonia
  • Track 8-2Cholera.
  • Track 8-3Leprosy
  • Track 8-4Tuberculosis
  • Track 8-5Plague
  • Track 9-1Bacterial nutrition
  • Track 9-2Bacterial growth
  • Track 9-3Bacterial metabolism
  • Track 9-4Bacterial replication
  • Track 10-1Bacterial genome evolution
  • Track 10-2Genome comparisons and phylogeny
  • Track 10-3Genomic reduction
  • Track 11-1Biochemical testing
  • Track 11-2Hybridization-based detection
  • Track 11-3Molecular diagnostic methods for bacterial detection
  • Track 11-4Amplification methods
  • Track 12-1Applications of viral vectors
  • Track 12-2Industrial processes end products
  • Track 12-3Bioprocess engineering and systems biology
  • Track 12-4Microfactories-microbial production
  • Track 13-1¬†Applications and innovations
  • Track 13-2Scientic methods oriented towards natural sciences
  • Track 13-3Environment and health risk assessment and management
  • Track 13-4Research methods in environmental science
  • Track 14-1Microbial
  • Track 14-2Viral pathogenesis
  • Track 14-3Immunological host response to infections
  • Track 14-4Tumour immunity
  • Track 14-5Immunodeficiency
  • Track 15-1Evolution of bacteriology pathogens
  • Track 15-2Classification of plant- pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 15-3Epidemiology and control of bacterial plant diseases
  • Track 15-4Future prospects in plant bacteriology
  • Track 16-1Animal health
  • Track 16-2Zoonoses
  • Track 16-3Food safety
  • Track 16-4Preventive measures
  • Track 17-1Mutualism
  • Track 17-2Commensalism
  • Track 17-3Amensalism
  • Track 17-4Antimicrobials